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Too (5 Patterns)

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Common mistakes

  1. (NG) I am too much tired today, so I’m going to go to bed early.
    1. (OK) I am too tired today, so I’m going to go to bed early.
  2. (NG) Jack walks quickly too much.
    1. (OK) Jack walks too quickly.

Grammar words and phrases in context

It was really cold today. In fact, it was too cold. I’m tired of the winter. When it snows, the traffic moves too slowly and it takes a long time to go somewhere. I think it’s much too dangerous to drive in the snow and this year we’ve had too many snowstorms. It snows too much in New York. That’s for sure!

We use too followed by an adjective.

  1. It’s too cold today.
  2. I can’t go to the gym today because I’m too tired.
  3. Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was too far.

We use too followed by an adverb.

  1. They walk too slowly.
  2. The new teacher speaks too quickly.
  3. Traffic is moving too slowly this morning.

We use much followed by too followed by an adjective or much followed by too followed by an adverb.

  1. I can’t go to the gym today because I’m much too tired.
  2. Emily wanted to go there, but she said it was much too far.
  3. The new teacher speaks much too quickly.
  4. Traffic is moving much too slowly this morning.

We use too followed by many followed by a countable noun or too followed by much followed by a non‐countable noun.

  1. There were too many snowstorms last winter.
  2. Nicole said she has too many bills to pay this month.
  3. There is too much time between now and the warm days of spring in the Big Apple.
  4. Eating too much junk food is not good for your health.

We use too much after the verb

  1. I’m worried about Tommy. He smokes too much.
  2. I think Vincent works too much.
  3. Don’t you think Jenny talks too much?

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