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Even vs. Even Though vs. Even If

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Common mistakes

  1. (NG) Even I go there early, I can’t get a ticket.
    1. (OK) Even if I go there early, I won’t be able to get a ticket.
  2. (NG) Even if I studied, I didn’t pass the exam.
    1. (OK) Even though I studied, I didn’t pass the exam.

Grammar words and phrases in context

A friend of mine loves to drive. No matter the weather or the circumstances, she enjoys driving. She has a Jeep, so even if it snows, she can drive safely. Of course, that’s even though we always tell her not to. Her Jeep is interesting too. It has a lot of high technology like a GPS and automatic parking. It even has a TV in the dashboard!

Even

Even is an adverb. Even shows that something is unexpected or surprising, and this gives emphasis to that thing.

  1. It was hard to see the road in the fog, even with the headlights on.
  2. She was a popular actress and singer, and even a politician.
  3. Bob can do many things. He even has a pilot’s license.
  4. Everyone from the office went to the party. Even Ted went, and he hates going to parties.

Even though

We use even though to show unexpected results. The meaning is similar to but. Keep in mind, the structure is even though followed by a subject and verb. Here’s an example: Even though it was raining, I went to the beach. On a rainy day, going to the beach is unexpected. So we would say, “Even though it was raining, I went to the beach.” This has the same meaning as It was raining, but I went to the beach.

Here are some other examples:

  1. Even though I was full, I had dessert.
  2. Even though it’s a little expensive, I want to buy an Apple watch.
  3. Jack bought a motorcycle, even though he doesn’t know how to ride it.
  4. Marco is still smoking even though his doctor told him to stop.

[blockquote type=”center”][highlight type=”light”]Please have a look here to learn about even though, although, and though.[/highlight] [/blockquote]

Even if

We use if to talk about a condition:

  1. If it rains tomorrow, I will stay home and read a book.
  2. If I win the lottery, I will buy a big house.
  3. If I were taller, I would play basketball.
  4. If I had more time, I could start learning Chinese.

We use even if to show that the condition doesn’t matter. The structure is even if followed by a subject and verb.

  1. I have plans to go to the beach today. Even if it rains, I’m still going to go to the beach. (So “even if it rains” means the condition of raining doesn’t matter because I’m still going to go to the beach. “I have plans to go to the beach today. Even if it rains, I’m going to go to the beach.”)
  2. This restaurant is famous for its delicious dessert. Even if I am full, I am going to order the dessert!
  3. I’m still not good at playing ping-pong. Even if I practice every week, I probably won’t improve.

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