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Although vs. Though vs. Even Though

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Common Mistakes

  1. (NG) Even though rain, I went to the beach.
    1. (OK) Even though it rained, I went to the beach.
  2. (NG) I went to the beach. It rained, although.
    1. (OK) I went to the beach. It rained, though.
  3. (NG) Although rain, I went to the beach.
    1. (OK) Although it rained, I went to the beach.

 Grammar words and phrases in context

I love the beach and although I live a little far from the shore, I love to go there. I’m going to go to the beach today even though it’s raining a little. I’ll probably just sit in my car and look at the waves. That’s ok for me, though. As long as I can experience the beach, I’m happy.

Although

We use although before a subject/verb as a conjunction to mean but. When using although at the beginning, separate the introductory clause with a comma.

  1. Although it rained a lot, I had a good time in London.
  2. I couldn’t get a ticket for the baseball game although I went online before the sale started.
  3. Jack didn’t make the sale although he talked to the customer for two hours.

Even though is a stronger form of although and is also used before a subject/verb as a conjunction to mean but. When using even though at the beginning, separate the introductory clause with a comma.

  1. Even though it rained a lot, I had a good time in London.
  2. I couldn’t get a ticket for the baseball game even though I went online before the sale started.
  3. Jack didn’t make the sale even though he talked to the customer for two hours.

It’s also possible to use though, which is a weaker form of although. Generally, though is used at the beginning of a sentence, not in the middle, like although and even though. As well, when using though at the beginning, separate the introductory clause with a comma.

  1. Though it rained a lot, I had a good time in London.
  2. Though I went online before the sale started, I couldn’t get a ticket for the baseball game.
  3. Though he talked to the customer for two hours, Jack didn’t make the sale.

In conversational English, we sometimes put though at the end of the second sentence.

  1. It rained a lot and it was cold. We had a nice vacation though.
  2. I went online before the sale started. I couldn’t get a ticket though.
  3. Jack didn’t make the sale. He talked to the customer for two hours though.

[blockquote type=”center”][highlight type=”light”]Please have a look here to learn about even, even if, and even though.[/highlight] [/blockquote]
[custom_headline type=”center” level=”h3″ looks_like=”h4″ accent=”true”]Now, try this review quiz[/custom_headline][custom_headline type=”left” level=”h3″ looks_like=”h4″ accent=”true”]Make one sentence from two using although, though, or even though[/custom_headline]


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