[content_band style=”color: #222;” class=”cat-food” bg_color=”#ffffff” border=”horizontal” inner_container=”true”] [container] [column type=”1/6″]

[/column] [column type=”5/6″ last=”true”]

All vs. Every vs. Each

[/column] [/container]

Common mistakes:

  1. (NG) All car has four wheels.
    1. (OK) All cars have four wheels.
  2. (NG) Every cars have for wheels.
    1. (OK) Every car has four wheels.
  3. (NG) Every of my friends likes pizza.
    1. (OK) All of my friends like pizza.

 Grammar words and phrases in context

I guess you could say I’m a pizzaholic. All my friends like pizza too and, in fact, every one of my friends can eat a lot of pizza in one sitting. Each of them has a favorite pizza shop, but we all like the old shop named Frank’s Pizza in our neighborhood. And I love all kinds of pizza; Neapolitan, Sicilian, Chicago style, all of them are ok for me. Toppings? Well, I like every topping except anchovy. Those little fish are too salty for me.

 All

We use all plus a plural noun or uncountable noun when we talk about things in general. All cars means all cars in the world in general.

  1. All cars have four wheels.
  2. All people need air and water to survive.
  3. All buildings have an entrance.

We use all of plus a determiner when we refer to a particular or specific thing or group of things. You can say things like all of the, all of my, all of these, all of those, etc.

  1. All of the cars in that shop are very expensive.
  2. All of my friends like to eat pizza.
  3. All of those buildings were built in the 19th

In conversational English, we can also use all without “of” plus a determiner when we refer to a particular or specific thing or group of things. You can say things like all the, all my, all these, all those, etc.

  1. All the cars in that shop are very expensive.
  2. All my friends like to eat pizza.
  3. All those buildings were built in the 19th

We use every plus a singular noun when we talk about a particular or specific thing that both the speaker/writer and listener/reader are familiar with.

  1. Every car in that shop is very expensive.
  2. Every person on earth needs air and water to survive.
  3. Every building on this campus has an entrance.

We use also use each plus a singular noun when we talk about a particular or specific thing that both the speaker/writer and listener/reader are familiar with.

  1. Each pen has the company logo on it.
  2. Each student will have an opportunity to talk to the teacher.
  3. They make each cup by hand.

The basic difference between all, every, and each is that we use all with a plural noun and each and every with a singular noun. Next, let’s look at every and each.

In many general situations, we use each and every with the same meaning. This is most common when we talk about time.

  1. Jack works hard each day (or) Jack works hard every day.
  2. Each year, we get older and wiser (or) Every year, we get older and wiser.
  3. Each time I see her I get happy (or) Every time I see her I get happy.

However, we generally tend to use each when we think of things individually or separately. There may be a group of things or people, and we use each when we talk about them on an individual basis.

  1. Each pen has the company logo on it. This means, the pens, one by one, have the company logo.
  2. Each student will have an opportunity to talk to the teacher. This means, the students, one by one, can talk to the teacher.
  3. They make each cup by hand. This means, the cups, one by one, are handmade.

However, we tend to use every when we think of things as part of a group, similar to the way we use all.

  1. Every person on the tour receives a hat and a rain poncho. This means, all of the people on the tour will receive a hat and a rain poncho.
  2. Every guest at the party had fun. This means, all of the people who came to the party had fun.
  3. Every player on the team trained hard for the game. This means the whole team trained hard.

We also use each and not every when we talk about two things:

  1. The child held a cookie in each hand.
  2. Married life is sometimes not easy. Each person needs to compromise at some point.

Finally, we also use each and not every before the preposition, of.

  1. Each of these pens has the company logo on it.
  2. Each of you should follow me.

[custom_headline type=”center” level=”h3″ looks_like=”h4″ accent=”true”]Now, try this review quiz[/custom_headline]
[custom_headline type=”center” level=”h4″ looks_like=”h5″ accent=”true”](Some questions have more than one answer!)[/custom_headline]


[/content_band]